In This Issue

Autumn is here once again, and with it comes to glorious bounty of the harvest. The shadows grow longer, the golden sunsets set the sky on fire, and smells like wood, caramel and straw bring back memories of harvest traditions and happy Halloween nights. When approaching the Harry & David

When the Messenger requested an interview with Kyndra Laughery, she responded with enthusiasm and also with a quote from Augusto Boal, a Brazilian theatre director, writer and politician and the founder of Theatre of the Oppressed: “It is not the place of the theatre to show the correct path, but

Why should Ebert and Roeper get to have all the fun? Or Rotten Tomatoes make up their own “tomatometer”? Not only do the viewers of the annual Ashland New Plays Festival on October 18 through 22 get to give their opinion on the plays presented, but the playwrights are right

Harvard political scientist Robert Putnam’s influential 2000 book, Bowling Alone, charts Americans’ social disengagement, from declining church attendance, to fewer family dinners, to “bowling alone.” Putnam’s chief reason for America’s diminishing sociability? The rise of television. One suspects that Putnam might never have entered a sports bar, home field for

With only 10 minutes left in their game on September 30, the SOU Raiders were, once again, firmly in control, up 24-10 over Rocky Mountain. It was becoming a common position; dominating the game with high offense scores. But in the fourth quarter, their opponents suddenly turned the tables, racking

  As we pulled the car up to the barn where we buy free-range eggs, our farmer was busily involved in a different kind of farming task. He was plucking turkeys for a customer—looks like an early Thanksgiving, she had three freshly harvested and plucked turkeys in the back of

An Important Year for Pride

The Times of Harvey Milk There is an interview somewhere in the middle of The Times of Harvey Milk with a union man. In today’s politically-correct world he would be a Neanderthal, and using language and prejudices no longer permissible in polite society. He unabashedly admits his bias against gay

By Mara Owens Pride. It’s a tiny, but weighted word that most people take utterly for granted. For the LGBTQI community, Pride means the very real knowledge that we are not alone, that we are part of a bigger, broader community that provides, in the words of author Armistead Maupin,

Pride 2017 is around the corner, and for the LGBT community in the valley, this annual celebration may be more important than ever. Just last year, a deadly rampage took the lives of 49 people and injured 53 others at Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, shocking the world. Nine

Local production company Twin Heroes just put the wraps on a summer of artistic events that invited audiences into works of compassion and common ground, anchored by Transcend: Queer Arts Festival in August. Local artists and producers Alex Vassos and Tulsi Florence produced Transcend, which featured three Ashland spaces given

Working at a University back in Texas years and years ago, I noticed stickers in certain office windows — “Ally,” they read — with a rainbow background. After inquiring, I learned that many of the staff members and professors wanted to ensure a safe space for LGBTQ and questioning students.

Sound

It’s a common mistake of young musicians to pick a name with historical context that will rank the band higher in Google results. But it strangely works in favor of Spokane darkwave artist Connor Knowles, who’s performing name, The Dancing Plague of 1518 brings back search results that only increase

Gill Landry may be performing on the big stage at the Historic Ashland Armory on Thursday October 19, but the streets are where he believes he learned the art of performing; in particular, he explained, he picked up a few habits from his time as a busker in Eugene, where

  The first time I saw Kelvin Underwood perform was an experimental hip hop open mic in Ashland. Most of the other emcees played beats from their phones and lazily rhymed about weed. He came on stage with a massive Japanese taiko drum, and complex, polyrhythmic flows so sociopolitically savage
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