Posts Tagged

City of Medford

Rogue Valley Messenger: Your “calling card” issue for this campaign has publicly been said to be banning marijuana grows. Why are you opposed? Ruth Moncus: Family and children. Look, we need to consider our own children in this election cycle and what future we want for our families. Many people already

In our last issue, we ran Q&A with several of the candidates for city council in Medford. We tried to contact all of the candidates, but only some responded. The email listed for Nick Lancaster, candidate for Medford City Council, Ward 2, was incorrect and he did not receive the

Rogue Valley Messenger: What is your “calling card” issue for this campaign? Michelle Blum Atkinson: Public safety is the most important aspect of government. I think it would be great if Medford were known as the “safest city in America.” By setting robust goals, we have something to work towards.

Kay Brooks Rogue Valley Messenger: You have served on city committees. How has that experience either prepared or inspired you to run for council? Kay Brooks: Serving as a Housing and Community Development Commissioner for the City has provided a profound opportunity to better understand the breadth of needs and desires

Tim D’Alessandro Rogue Valley Messenger: What did you learn from your previous campaigns? When I ran in 2014, I learned the importance of meeting as many people in the ward as possible and listening to what they would like to see happen if I were elected to serve on the

Medford City Council Candidates: The Good, Bad and Email Ugly Over the past couple weeks, we reached out to candidates for offices in Medford. With three seats open, and a changing political center and demographic in that city, there is a wide field for the positions, and a great possibility

In last week’s elections, Jackson County voters kindly approved Measure 15-141, a temporary property tax levy that will provide funding for Rogue Valley Transportation District (RVTD) to restore services on Saturdays, provide services for students and generally keep public transportation viable in the region. For the past few issues of

By Phil Busse, with reporting by Ryan Degan Although everyone gathered at last week’s city council hearing in Medford seemed to agree that there is an increasing number of—and immediate need to do something, anything for—homeless men and women in the area, there was not a shared idea about a

Pushing for $15 an Hour is the Most Dominant Legislative Discussion As the state legislature began to gather for its session, Governor Kate Brown announced a six-year plan to steadily raise minimum wage in Oregon—and, in doing so, struck the dominant chord for upcoming conversations about law-making in the state.

RVM: When did you first get involved in politics? Clay Bearnson: I first got involved in politics in the spring of 2012. One of the council members was stepping down due to health issues, so I went for the appointment. After I didn’t get the appointment they told me it