Author Archive

Josh Gross

Josh Gross

Ace reporter. Produced playwright. Internationally recognized rock and roll superstar and burrito connoisseur.

Everything comes back in 20-year cycles. And though it may go by different names (garage, power-pop, indie), the stripped-down, revved up sound of ‘90s pop-punk complete with all its goofball antics is having a resurgent moment as those that grew up listening to it come into their own. Portland trio

It’s said that we never really leave high school. For music critics of a certain age, that can be a problem, as they endlessly pine for the fading sounds of their fading youth. For my certain age, however, it bring the extra complication that music was something very different when

  I think I’m done with OSF. A lot of things did it. For one, the hypocrisy of condemning a copy of Little Black Sambo being included in a downtown display of banned books, while staging Othello and The Merchant of Venice. As is, because if it’s on stage, then

Country isn’t exactly a genre short on nostalgia. But there’s still something extra special about the classic ‘60s sound; somber ballads by siren-voiced engenues with surfy guitars and dreamy vibes. And that’s exactly what you get with Whitney Rose, the Canadian by way of Texas singer that will be performing

James Deans, aka, Destructo Bunny, moved to Southern Oregon in October. Back in Ocean Beach, California, where he’d come from, there was a thriving hip hop scene, and Deans was a big part of it. He’d run the Ocean Beach Hip Hop Social for five years, a multi-discipline gathering of

Writing about music has never exactly been straightforward. But it’s definitely getting harder to write about Americana. The genre is oversaturated, and so full of both modern and traditional conventions, that a lot of it just blends together. I can’t really say that about King Roy Wing, and their new

On the surface, drawing a clean line between the music of Intuitive Compass, and the solo work of guitar player Jason Dea West is a bit thorny. The warble of his distinctive voice and his deft finger-style attack on the resonator are the band’s Titanic-sized anchor, and that one-two punch

To say metal has a reputation is putting it lightly. But in this reporter’s experience, the predilection for drunk driving and ritual murder that stereotype presumes are less accurate than are the metalista’s traits as unrepentant goofballs. Quite commonly, metal sets its sights on the sharkiest shark out there, and

The most common band formation story is two college students playing guitar together on a dorm couch, and saying, “this is fun. Let’s find an endless parade of drummers.” Portland pop-rock act’s story is the second most common: old hands that knew each other through the local music scene full

Ashland folksters The Brothers Reed launched several years ago as a leaner, more frequently bookable vehicle for brothers Aaron and Phil Reed’s songs than their nitro-charged bar band, Bucklerash. As an acoustic duo, they could play virtually anywhere, regardless of noise constraints or whether the rhythm section was available. The