Author Archive

Josh Gross

Josh Gross

Ace reporter. Produced playwright. Internationally recognized rock and roll superstar and burrito connoisseur.

It’s a common mistake of young musicians to pick a name with historical context that will rank the band higher in Google results. But it strangely works in favor of Spokane darkwave artist Connor Knowles, who’s performing name, The Dancing Plague of 1518 brings back search results that only increase

  The first time I saw Kelvin Underwood perform was an experimental hip hop open mic in Ashland. Most of the other emcees played beats from their phones and lazily rhymed about weed. He came on stage with a massive Japanese taiko drum, and complex, polyrhythmic flows so sociopolitically savage

  Carly Rae Jepsen, the Canadian pop tart of “Call Me Maybe” fame, wrote more than 250 songs for her 2015 album, Emotion. That’s a pretty furious pace for someone that can’t even decide whether or not you should call her. Though he’s still a few songs short of  the

  In 1969, The Doors’ lead drinker Jim Morrison told Rolling Stone that he didn’t think the band of the future would be a band at all. “I can see a lone artist with a lot of tapes and electrical … like an extension of the Moog synthesizer — a

  There is a school of thought positing that rock is the new jazz. Like jazz was in the ‘50s, rock is now more labor, space and equipment intensive to produce and perform than brash, efficient upstarts knocking it off the charts (electronic pop), making it a niche genre that

In a widely-viewed video on YouTube discussing the Maggie Rogers song, “Alaska,” A-list producer Pharell Williams said he believes the Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup to be the pinnacle of innovation, as it managed to take two things that were independently great (chocolate and peanut butter) and combine into a chimera

On the surface, being locked in a room unable to escape is a nightmare. But for Kerri Franklin, owner of Escape Ashland, it’s a great family activity. “Once you do one [escape room], you get hooked,” she says. “Whenever you go to a new city, it’s like, ‘oh, do they

In a June interview with The Guardian, country star Steve Earle offered the hottest of hot takes on contemporary Nashville’s recent roster of twangy, chanty, odes to partying. “They’re just doing hip hop for people who are afraid of black people,” Earle said. “I like the new Kendrick Lamar album

I never cared for emo. Even just a few chords from bands like Dashboard Confessional, or Saves the Day, caused me to slip into some absurd macho stereotype of a high school football coach complete with the overwhelming urge to grab the band venting their inner turmoil by the ears

Like so many young Ashlanders, Sarah Kreisman has done time on the mean streets of Portland. But she found the streets in the city’s famed Belmont and Hawthorne districts a little less mean. “Those neighborhoods that had those beautiful little benches and libraries,” says Kreisman. “It felt like I was