Author Archive

Phil Busse

Phil Busse

Phil Busse has spent the past 20 years as a journalist, attorney and educator—and doing his tour of duty with alt-weeklies.

He has served as the Editor for the Source, a popular weekly newspaper in Bend, Oregon and was the founding Managing Editor for the Portland Mercury. While in law school, he wrote crime and legal stories for the Eugene Weekly and started his writing career as the first environmental beat reporter for San Francisco Weekly.

In 2006, Phil started the Media Institute for Social Change (MediaMakingChange.org), an educational non-profit. Based in Portland, Oregon, the organization hosts college students each summer to teach them how to produce public interest film and radio documentaries—and, in 2013, helped launch XRAY.FM, a talk and music radio station that won Willamette Week’s readers choice for Best Local Radio Station in 2015.

Phil is truly surprised that he ended up as a newspaperman; as a kid, he believed that he would grow up to be a spy, and has spent a lifetime acquiring the proper skills—he is certified SCUBA diver, knows how to tie a bow tie and can mix (shake) a mean martini.

Phil graduated from Middlebury College in 1992 and earned his law degree from the University of Oregon in 1997.

A month ago, three artists presented their ideas for art pieces to stand sentry at the south end of Ashland. It has been a long path to reach this point—nearly a decade in the planning and process. Shortly after those public presentations, a panel of local artists and art critics

From the perspective of many business-owners in Grants Pass, the idea for a sales tax—in Oregon?—came like on an unwelcome, fast-moving thunderstorm. There had been rumblings some three years ago, when the city apparently conducted a phone survey to judge interest. But then, the idea seemed to go quiet again.

The typical police chief, at least by Hollywood’s definition, is blustery, stern, no-nonsense, always threatening to take away a badge and a gun. Or, there is the other side of the spectrum, the portrayal of a portly police chief as innocuously kind as Santa Claus. Tim George, the police chief

Standing Stone cares about sustainability. In case we doubted that sentiment, on a recent visit, right away the server begins to lecture us (in a pleasant way) that the wheat for the beer is grown locally, and the hops, of course, as well. “I’m not really sure where the hops

On December 11, 2012, a 22-year old man rushed into the mall at Clackamas Town Center and shot dead two people. Three days later, a 20-year-old man walked into an elementary school in Connecticut and shot 20 school children and six adult staff members. In the aftermath, President Obama lamented

Nearly 18 months ago, voters in Jackson and Josephine County voted to ban genetically modified crops—or, GMOs, as they are better known. It was David versus Goliath politics. “We won that imitative on $20,000 because a group of citizens came together – liberal, conservative, someone from every stereotype,” says Mary

thurs 1 Breaking Pattern ART—Pattern, optical and perceptual abstract painting give a person the opportunity to contemplate the meaning of life, along with a trusty glass of wine in hand. Crater Lake Cellars will be pouring for the opening reception of Breaking Pattern, a display of paintings by seven multi-generational

Sure, the stock market has been a bit up-and-down lately, Pope Francis gently scolded our Congress last week and stores are starting to stock Christmas decorations already. But in the grand scheme, we have it pretty good here in the United States. A unifying theme of the Varsity World Film

Often when locals and outsiders alike consider southern Oregon, they start the conversation talking about the Ashland Shakespeare Festival and perhaps mentioning the Britt Fest. Maybe they even mention the burgeoning wine industry. All which are wonderful attributes and attractions for the region, and there are multiplier effects to the

Salmon fishing ended more than a month ago, and there are conservation reasons to let the spawning fish be. But there is also the practical reason not to fish salmon right now; that is, salmon who are spawning simply do not eat. Oh sure, points out “Pritch,” who identified himself