Author Archive

Josh Gross

Josh Gross

Ace reporter. Produced playwright. Internationally recognized rock and roll superstar and burrito connoisseur.

There’s an old joke in Hollywood: How do you become a producer? You say, “I’m a producer.” It’s basically the same with indie music labels. Starting one requires little more than saying it exists and then behaving accordingly. But starting one, and running it well are different animals altogether. And

I fell in love with compilations when I was 17. My parents owned a small rental house, and one of the tenants that vacated it left behind a basket full of tapes and CDs. One of them was a compilation from Fat Wreck Chords, a small Bay Area record label.

Occasionally, I teach self-marketing workshops for musicians. The thing most folks that show up want to know is how to get press coverage. My top answer is always the same: “send out a press release.” Reporters are mavens and information-junkies, but we’re not omniscient. And if you’re not marketing your

Lou Reed famous said “One chord is fine. Two chords is pushing it. Three chords and you’re into jazz.” Chicago-based duo North by North felt kind of the same way about band members, choosing to abandon a trio format and stuck to the fundamentals: guitar, drums, and a furious garage-rock

Soul music is deeply linked in the American consciousness to times and places in our country’s cultural history. Modern-day Seattle isn’t commonly among that geographic and cultural map. But that’s not slowing down Seattle singer Tiffany Wilson, who will be performing a string of local shows across the Rogue Valley.

It’s a common mistake of young musicians to pick a name with historical context that will rank the band higher in Google results. But it strangely works in favor of Spokane darkwave artist Connor Knowles, who’s performing name, The Dancing Plague of 1518 brings back search results that only increase

  The first time I saw Kelvin Underwood perform was an experimental hip hop open mic in Ashland. Most of the other emcees played beats from their phones and lazily rhymed about weed. He came on stage with a massive Japanese taiko drum, and complex, polyrhythmic flows so sociopolitically savage

  Carly Rae Jepsen, the Canadian pop tart of “Call Me Maybe” fame, wrote more than 250 songs for her 2015 album, Emotion. That’s a pretty furious pace for someone that can’t even decide whether or not you should call her. Though he’s still a few songs short of  the

  In 1969, The Doors’ lead drinker Jim Morrison told Rolling Stone that he didn’t think the band of the future would be a band at all. “I can see a lone artist with a lot of tapes and electrical … like an extension of the Moog synthesizer — a

  There is a school of thought positing that rock is the new jazz. Like jazz was in the ‘50s, rock is now more labor, space and equipment intensive to produce and perform than brash, efficient upstarts knocking it off the charts (electronic pop), making it a niche genre that