Author Archive

Josh Gross

Josh Gross

Ace reporter. Produced playwright. Internationally recognized rock and roll superstar and burrito connoisseur.

All around the Rogue Valley, pint-sized pitchers are winding up for their annual parade of adorableness: the Little League Playoffs, which involve players from Ashland to Gold Hill and all points in-between. But there’s one caveat: all those players are boys. The girls don’t have a playoff. It’s the kind

  In yet another example of last-ditch desperation to avoid progress, the Grants Pass City Council is currently drafting a law that would ban outdoor marijuana growing. Considering the region’s continuing political slide into being a forested version of Mad Max, that would essentially make it the only law in

Jeff Whitty Go-Go’s for broke with ‘Head Over Heels’ “This is my new world of outdoor theater,” Jeff Whitty says of the rain pouring down on a gray Ashland afternoon. “The rain and the owls.” The Tony-winning playwright of Avenue Q is hard at work on his new play, Head

We do our best to be informative here at The Messenger, to offer our readers the inside civic and cultural info they need to be super-citizens of the Rogue Valley, things like how upcoming elections will affect you and what upcoming live music you don’t want to miss. But it’s

Last year saw the debut of an ambitious new event at Southern Oregon University: the Oregon Fringe Festival, a weeklong showcase of all things outsider art, from guerilla theater to beatboxing jugglers to pop-up playgrounds on the SOU campus. The student-run festival is back for its second go and is

Re: Universal Background Checks I wanted to write and say good on Governor Kate Brown for signing universal background checks into law. But it’s a long-overdue, common sense move with strong popular support. Will that alone put an end to America’s epidemic of gun violence? Obviously not. But we should

thurs 28 Cabaret THEATRE—The instant 1966 Broadway classic and 12-time Tony winner Cabaret will see yet another revival in the perfect setting, The Oregon Cabaret Theatre. Set in 1931 in Berlin, the play is set it the Kit Kat Club, where metaphors for the political situation during WWII abound. And

  Coy Iacono lives off the side of the Redwood Highway in Grants Pass. But it isn’t the noise from the many passing trucks that bothers him. It’s the lack of it. “Every night when you fall asleep, a tour bus passes by,” he says. “And they need to stop.

Lots of musicians publish tell-all memoirs. Some tell a little more than others, like The Dirt, the collective autobiography of Motley Crue, which is a thrilling, though somewhat tawdry read. But those books are often written by ghostwriters, not the artists themselves. I recently found a copy of Woody Guthrie’s

With electronic music easier to make than ever, a resurgent acoustic culture and the pop charts being dominated by hip-hop, the louderati in Moses Nose, who will be playing two nights in Ashland, have a simple, clearly-defined struggle. “Not a lot of people connect with rock and roll like they