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HIGHLY, HIGHLY RECOMMENDED: A Kaddish for Bernie Madoff (Available April 24-25) It is not a Hollywood movie pitch: “A chamber-rock opera about the intersection of finance and spirituality.” And, oh yeah, at the center of the story is disgraced financier Bernie Madoff and his decade-old con job. Perhaps not a

HIGHLY, HIGHLY RECOMMENDED: Teddy, Out of Tune (Available April 26-27) Noted for its gentle assessment of individuals on the fringe of the American west, the feature film Nomadland has received far-reaching applause and accolades—and a few Oscar nods. Teddy, Out of Tune deserves just as much. A film that is

Anchor Point (Available April 19-20) The tone for Anchor Point is not incendiary, although the subject-matter is: Fighting forest fires and, more specifically, the challenge of two women to fit in—or not—to the male-dominated culture and policies of the U.S. Forest Service. To examine those (burning) questions, the documentary shadows

Impact (Available April 26-27) One of the strongest features for this year festival is exploring local issues and individuals—and this film is no exception: At the core of Impact is Medford-based Troy Wohosky, who was once a top junior boxer in the country (as in, number three, and an Olympic

HIGHLY, HIGHLY RECOMMENDED: American Gadfly (Available April 27-28) When first reading the briefing for this film, I assumed it was the premise for a Seth Rogen comedy: A group of daring teenagers recruit an 89-year old sharp-tongued former U.S. Senator out of his mothball retirement for an underdog bid for

Stalking Chernobyl: Exploration After Apocalypse (Available April 28-29) Chernobyl, Ukraine, was a town that was expected to last for millennia, especially due to the nuclear power station installed there in 1977 by the Soviet Union. The nearby town of Pripyat, Ukraine, was supported by the station, and the people of

2040 (Available April 16-17) Written as a letter to his young daughter, 2040 is an entertaining documentary by Australian writer/director, Damon Gameau (That Sugar Film), envisioning his hopes and dreams of a better planet for her in 20 years. Instead of bombarding viewers with a lot of dystopian-ish drama, this

In the Same Breath (Available April 16-17) A man widely opens his mouth, pressing so hard against his mask that indentations remain. He strains to say, “no oxygen,” while slowly asphyxiating, but health care workers cannot hear or help him. Later, the documentary cuts to a scene where the Chinese

Trammel (shown as part of the “Short Stories & Documentaries: Outsiders,” available April 15 – 29) “Trammel” both means to restrict one’s freedom, and also can refer to a tool that consists of two fixed points. It is also the title to a short film about one man, Dale, and

Bug Farm (14 minutes, Available April 15) Opening with the soothing tones of the harp, Bug Farm’s soundtrack quickly clashes into the sounds of crickets calling and various bugs skittering. Director Lydia Cornett says in her Director’s Statement that she hopes “Bug Farm offers a deeper look at the disparate

If you are planning to sell your house, having an elegant interior design would be useless if your potential buyers won’t even lay their eyes on your home. However, having an attractive outdoor area will get their attention without even asking them to look or inviting them to go inside.

Bean bags are comfortable for several settings, especially with the current situation of people right now. Due to the pandemic, we were forced to retreat and spend a lot of time in our homes. Moreover, we learned to adjust our school responsibilities, work, and other roles. If you bought this

“Doesn’t it feel good to be back?!,” frontman Jay Rapp bellowed to the crowd as they forged through their hour-plus long set at Grape Street Bar on Friday, March 12. After the socially distanced crowd’s enthusiastic response to Rapp’s question, the night carried on with the band plowing through their

SOUND

Voted “Bestie” band in the Messenger’s last survey of our readers favorites—the very last print issue we were able to produce in March 2020 before shutting down presses for a year—The Brothers Reed are an active and beloved group of, yes, family members.  Half of the duo, Aaron Reed talked

Jen Ambrose has been a part of the Southern Oregon music scene for at least 20 years now. She studied flute, oboe, and piano in her early years. Then, she picked up the guitar and is now known for six and twelve string stylings ranging from intricate picking to fast

Slow Corpse got its start in Ashland and they have been actively involved in the Rogue Valley music community for six years. They signed with indie label Tender Loving Empire in 2017 and released their first studio album Fables the following year. Composed of lead vocalist Mitchell Winters and Brenton

Beyond the Valley

Vikki Gilmore’s latest release “Doubt of My Mind” was written, recorded, and produced remotely in collaboration with Mathieu LeGuerrier, as a creative byproduct of the COVID-19 lockdown. This endearing indie-folk reverie was inspired by the hardship and universal loneliness of a global pandemic, mixed with the anxiety of self-doubt that

Last week, I received an email from Ian Urbina, and it was the first I had heard of his ongoing project The Outlaw Ocean, and the outreach of The Outlaw Ocean Music Project. Read on for some more information about this exciting effort, and episode 3 of The Weekly Catch,

Within days of Ireland’s lockdown, BBC Folk Award winner and RTÉ Radio 1 Folk Awards nominee Daoirí Farrell set up a corner of his kitchen as a makeshift stage and began live streaming. There was no plan to make this a regular event but with close to 2k comments and
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