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Oregon Shakespeare Festival

There’s no one word fit to summarize OSF’s marvelous adaptation of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. It’s funny. Raunchy. Tragic. Surprising. And, with Sara Bruner’s performance of both twins Viola and Sebastian together in the final scene, it’s ultimately transcendent.  Obviously, Shakespeare never knew that 1930s Hollywood would come to be, but

If breeches get you excited and you don’t leave the house without an embroidered handkerchief, it would logically follow that the Oregon Shakespeare Festival is not only about drama on stage for you, but a chance to check out the fashions gone by. But since pantaloons and ruffs aren’t available

Typically, Oregon Shakespeare Festival productions allude to contemporary issues through costume and set design choices that attempt to cast the historical or “universal” struggles of humanity into a modern context. It’s latest production cuts straight to the chase. Sweat, which opened on July 29, and will run through October 31,

As a part of the Daedalus Project activities, the OSF Archives will be honoring the late actor Rex Rabold on the 25th anniversary of his passing. Rex acted with the Oregon Shakespeare Festival for nine seasons, and created iconic performances including his 1987 Richard II, and 1988’s Enrico IV. Join

Show-Stopper   Oregon Shakespeare Festival opened The Happiest Song Plays Last, on July 7. The play is the third in a trilogy from playwright Quiara Alegría Hudes, about a soldier’s search for meaning after returning from war in Iraq. Though it is the third in the series, it can be

The play tells the story of Edmund Dantes, a trusting merchant sailor who is wrongfully thrown into prison through the scheming of those who coveted what he had. After 18 years in prison, he finally escapes, procures a fortune and sets about exacting his revenge on those who framed him.

Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland is getting ready to open its outdoor stage, The Elizabethan Theatre. But as you can tell from this picture, it looked pretty different back in the 1970s, when passersby on the sidewalk could catch a play just by standing on their toes. If you’ve got