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Everything comes back in 20-year cycles. And though it may go by different names (garage, power-pop, indie), the stripped-down, revved up sound of ‘90s pop-punk complete with all its goofball antics is having a resurgent moment as those that grew up listening to it come into their own. Portland trio

It’s said that we never really leave high school. For music critics of a certain age, that can be a problem, as they endlessly pine for the fading sounds of their fading youth. For my certain age, however, it bring the extra complication that music was something very different when

Punk-metal band American Standards have released five albums in seven years, and until last year had never recorded consecutive albums with the same line-up. Vocalist Brandon Kellum and guitarist Corey Skowronski have played 300 shows together since 2011. Joined by bassist Steven Mandell, and drummer Mitch Hosier, they plan to

Country isn’t exactly a genre short on nostalgia. But there’s still something extra special about the classic ‘60s sound; somber ballads by siren-voiced engenues with surfy guitars and dreamy vibes. And that’s exactly what you get with Whitney Rose, the Canadian by way of Texas singer that will be performing

James Deans, aka, Destructo Bunny, moved to Southern Oregon in October. Back in Ocean Beach, California, where he’d come from, there was a thriving hip hop scene, and Deans was a big part of it. He’d run the Ocean Beach Hip Hop Social for five years, a multi-discipline gathering of

Writing about music has never exactly been straightforward. But it’s definitely getting harder to write about Americana. The genre is oversaturated, and so full of both modern and traditional conventions, that a lot of it just blends together. I can’t really say that about King Roy Wing, and their new

On the surface, drawing a clean line between the music of Intuitive Compass, and the solo work of guitar player Jason Dea West is a bit thorny. The warble of his distinctive voice and his deft finger-style attack on the resonator are the band’s Titanic-sized anchor, and that one-two punch

Portland native Scott Pemberton is part guitarist, part stuntman; utilizing unconventional playing methods and an array of percussion instruments along with bassist Jack “The Stabilizer” Johnson, keyboard/multi-instrumentalist Rudy Slizewski, and drummer James Sissler, to ensure that The Scott Pemberton Band’s musical kung-fu is anything but “the typical jam band.” And

To say metal has a reputation is putting it lightly. But in this reporter’s experience, the predilection for drunk driving and ritual murder that stereotype presumes are less accurate than are the metalista’s traits as unrepentant goofballs. Quite commonly, metal sets its sights on the sharkiest shark out there, and

Eugene dance-rock quartet Fortune’s Folly have been turning fans into friends since their first show. And for the past four years vocalist Calysta Cheyenne, guitarist Ira Mazie, bassist Jesse Sanchez, and drummer Alex “Squatch” Koleber, have been playing up and down the west coast bringing friends into the “Folly Family.”