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Sound

It’s a common mistake of young musicians to pick a name with historical context that will rank the band higher in Google results. But it strangely works in favor of Spokane darkwave artist Connor Knowles, who’s performing name, The Dancing Plague of 1518 brings back search results that only increase

Gill Landry may be performing on the big stage at the Historic Ashland Armory on Thursday October 19, but the streets are where he believes he learned the art of performing; in particular, he explained, he picked up a few habits from his time as a busker in Eugene, where

  The first time I saw Kelvin Underwood perform was an experimental hip hop open mic in Ashland. Most of the other emcees played beats from their phones and lazily rhymed about weed. He came on stage with a massive Japanese taiko drum, and complex, polyrhythmic flows so sociopolitically savage

An Interview with Co-Director Jared Davidson   At this point, The  Southern Oregon Music Festival is older than some of its own performers. The multi-venue music fest is now in its 29th year of bringing jazz, blues, and more to downtown Medford. Altogether, 17 bands will perform 95 sets at

The formative years for musicians are important. Inspirations get mashed into one, and out comes someone’s own creativity. For high school friends Eric Larson and Joe Myers in Boise, instrumental post-rock, bands bands like “Godspeed You! Black Emperor” and “Explosions in the Sky” where these big inspirations. Their sprawling arrangements

  Carly Rae Jepsen, the Canadian pop tart of “Call Me Maybe” fame, wrote more than 250 songs for her 2015 album, Emotion. That’s a pretty furious pace for someone that can’t even decide whether or not you should call her. Though he’s still a few songs short of  the

  In 1969, The Doors’ lead drinker Jim Morrison told Rolling Stone that he didn’t think the band of the future would be a band at all. “I can see a lone artist with a lot of tapes and electrical … like an extension of the Moog synthesizer — a

  There is a school of thought positing that rock is the new jazz. Like jazz was in the ‘50s, rock is now more labor, space and equipment intensive to produce and perform than brash, efficient upstarts knocking it off the charts (electronic pop), making it a niche genre that

In a widely-viewed video on YouTube discussing the Maggie Rogers song, “Alaska,” A-list producer Pharell Williams said he believes the Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup to be the pinnacle of innovation, as it managed to take two things that were independently great (chocolate and peanut butter) and combine into a chimera

Mike Dillon was somewhere in Illinois, on the way to a gig, when he explained the general idea behind his band to The Messenger on the phone. “I’m taking a percussion ensemble, and taking it to the rock n’ roll environment,” says Dillon. “The way Tito Puente and Lionel Hampton