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RVM: Maslow Project talks about “a hand up, not a handout.” Can you explain a bit more about what this looks like? KP: Generally, people think of a “handout” as something you give to someone that meets an immediate need (like food/hunger), but doesn’t change anything in the larger picture.

Wenonoa Spivak is the Director of Programs and Education of Court Appointed Special Advocates—or, as it is better known, CASA. CASA was one of the organizations at the Messenger’s Giving Tuesday event, and will be featured in our upcoming Give Guide. CASA works with hundreds of kids each year to

Henry Rollins is a cultural force. Launched nearly 35 years ago as the take-no-prisoner singer for Black Flag, Rollins has gone to bundle a career as a writer, radio personality, actor and activist. One thing he isn’t, however, is a weed smoker. What then is he doing keynoting the Oregon

So far, Oregon’s efforts to curb harmful emissions has been, well, a lot of hot air. The state legislature started making plans a decade ago to lower greenhouse gases—and slow global warming. However, those plans were largely wishes and prayers, and not concrete plans. In the ensuing decade, emissions have

When the Messenger requested an interview with Kyndra Laughery, she responded with enthusiasm and also with a quote from Augusto Boal, a Brazilian theatre director, writer and politician and the founder of Theatre of the Oppressed: “It is not the place of the theatre to show the correct path, but

  Well, the bad news is that one out of five youth in Oregon (10 – 17 years old) is considered obese. The good news? That is the lowest rate in the nation for childhood obesity. (Okay, that’s maybe mixed news.) The even better news is that Rogue Valley Farm

  Earlier this summer, Jamie McLeod-Skinner announced her plan to become Oregon’s next U.S. Representative, a seat held for 18 years by conservative Greg Walden. An Ashland high graduate, McLeod-Skinner returned back to her home turf after far-flung work experiences in Bosnia and Kosovo in the late 90s, and then

  Financial aid for college can be a tricky proposition: Loans can help pay for school, but also can dig a financial hole that takes years to get out of. It is a tricky, billion-dollar question that is limiting access to college for tens of thousands of students nationwide, and

Rogue Valley Messenger: This is our “weed issue.” Medford City Council has had some strident debates about legalized weed—and, in some ways, the policy is split, in that dispensaries are legal but outdoor grows not. Do those policies seem at odds with each other? Kevin Stine: It is the compromise

Rogue Valley Messenger: Your company seems to be at an important crossroads of trends –with more and more household items dependent on batteries, and with a continued concern about sustainability. Any predictions for how people will get their energy for household items ten years from now—and from what sources. Brett