Author Archive

Phil Busse

Phil Busse

Phil Busse has spent the past 20 years as a journalist, attorney and educator—and doing his tour of duty with alt-weeklies.

He has served as the Editor for the Source, a popular weekly newspaper in Bend, Oregon and was the founding Managing Editor for the Portland Mercury. While in law school, he wrote crime and legal stories for the Eugene Weekly and started his writing career as the first environmental beat reporter for San Francisco Weekly.

In 2006, Phil started the Media Institute for Social Change (MediaMakingChange.org), an educational non-profit. Based in Portland, Oregon, the organization hosts college students each summer to teach them how to produce public interest film and radio documentaries—and, in 2013, helped launch XRAY.FM, a talk and music radio station that won Willamette Week’s readers choice for Best Local Radio Station in 2015.

Phil is truly surprised that he ended up as a newspaperman; as a kid, he believed that he would grow up to be a spy, and has spent a lifetime acquiring the proper skills—he is certified SCUBA diver, knows how to tie a bow tie and can mix (shake) a mean martini.

Phil graduated from Middlebury College in 1992 and earned his law degree from the University of Oregon in 1997.

RVM: Maslow Project talks about “a hand up, not a handout.” Can you explain a bit more about what this looks like? KP: Generally, people think of a “handout” as something you give to someone that meets an immediate need (like food/hunger), but doesn’t change anything in the larger picture.

Wenonoa Spivak is the Director of Programs and Education of Court Appointed Special Advocates—or, as it is better known, CASA. CASA was one of the organizations at the Messenger’s Giving Tuesday event, and will be featured in our upcoming Give Guide. CASA works with hundreds of kids each year to

Henry Rollins is a cultural force. Launched nearly 35 years ago as the take-no-prisoner singer for Black Flag, Rollins has gone to bundle a career as a writer, radio personality, actor and activist. One thing he isn’t, however, is a weed smoker. What then is he doing keynoting the Oregon

A few days before Halloween, on a sunny Sunday afternoon, with the autumn leaves blazing red and orange, the Messenger’s Board of Directors gathered for its first strategic meeting. (In case we haven’t hit you over the head with it, the Messenger became a nonprofit this summer.) The strategic meeting

So far, Oregon’s efforts to curb harmful emissions has been, well, a lot of hot air. The state legislature started making plans a decade ago to lower greenhouse gases—and slow global warming. However, those plans were largely wishes and prayers, and not concrete plans. In the ensuing decade, emissions have

A year ago, according to most pundits and predications, Hilary Clinton was skating on her way to becoming president. There are many alternate realities that would have evolved from that result. Instead, it has been a challenging 12 months for many Americans, and one defined by strife and strident tweets.

Near Rite Aid and adjacent to Subway in Ashland may not seem like the crossroads between enlightened and spiritual, but it is the new location of the Rogue Valley Metaphysical Library, a space more like an age-old apothecary shop than a strip mall, filled with wisdom, ideas and 1000s of

Like any true maverick, film director and writer Alex Cox is not easy to pin down. His movies are difficult to categorize, gleefully and absurdly borrowing icons, ideas and images from different eras and genres. At the most recent Ashland Independent Film Festival, a recent production of his, Tombstone Rashomon,

Momix is perhaps one of the most populist contemporary dance companies in the world; that is, they have already been to your living room and have brought the funky acrobatics and fluid contortions usually reserved for SoHo arthouses to mainstream America through a Hanes underwear ad with dancers rolling on

This Halloween the scariest monster in southern Oregon is the LNG pipeline. Like a zombie that won’t die, the proposed pipeline continues to come back again and again, even though the townspeople vanquished it repeatedly. The proposal is to place pipeline that will run diagonally all the way from the California