Author Archive

Phil Busse

Phil Busse

Phil Busse has spent the past 20 years as a journalist, attorney and educator—and doing his tour of duty with alt-weeklies.

He has served as the Editor for the Source, a popular weekly newspaper in Bend, Oregon and was the founding Managing Editor for the Portland Mercury. While in law school, he wrote crime and legal stories for the Eugene Weekly and started his writing career as the first environmental beat reporter for San Francisco Weekly.

In 2006, Phil started the Media Institute for Social Change (MediaMakingChange.org), an educational non-profit. Based in Portland, Oregon, the organization hosts college students each summer to teach them how to produce public interest film and radio documentaries—and, in 2013, helped launch XRAY.FM, a talk and music radio station that won Willamette Week’s readers choice for Best Local Radio Station in 2015.

Phil is truly surprised that he ended up as a newspaperman; as a kid, he believed that he would grow up to be a spy, and has spent a lifetime acquiring the proper skills—he is certified SCUBA diver, knows how to tie a bow tie and can mix (shake) a mean martini.

Phil graduated from Middlebury College in 1992 and earned his law degree from the University of Oregon in 1997.

This Halloween the scariest monster in southern Oregon is the LNG pipeline. Like a zombie that won’t die, the proposed pipeline continues to come back again and again, even though the townspeople vanquished it repeatedly. The proposal is to place pipeline that will run diagonally all the way from the California

The Times of Harvey Milk There is an interview somewhere in the middle of The Times of Harvey Milk with a union man. In today’s politically-correct world he would be a Neanderthal, and using language and prejudices no longer permissible in polite society. He unabashedly admits his bias against gay

When the Messenger requested an interview with Kyndra Laughery, she responded with enthusiasm and also with a quote from Augusto Boal, a Brazilian theatre director, writer and politician and the founder of Theatre of the Oppressed: “It is not the place of the theatre to show the correct path, but

With only 10 minutes left in their game on September 30, the SOU Raiders were, once again, firmly in control, up 24-10 over Rocky Mountain. It was becoming a common position; dominating the game with high offense scores. But in the fourth quarter, their opponents suddenly turned the tables, racking

  Well, the bad news is that one out of five youth in Oregon (10 – 17 years old) is considered obese. The good news? That is the lowest rate in the nation for childhood obesity. (Okay, that’s maybe mixed news.) The even better news is that Rogue Valley Farm

One of the deep-seated ironies of the ballet is that a respectfully helping of the men who dance are gay, yet the bulk of ballets are, not to sound too stiff and academic, not gender-confirming: You know, the prince seeking his princesses kind of stuff. But for the past four

Being a Cubs’ fan is a religious experience. Or, at least so say Cub fans, and writer Mark Scarpaci is one of those, and he has poured that love of the Cubs, of baseball, and of friendship into “Wrigley Sanders.” The novel draws from Cubs’/ storied folklore and heartbreak, as

  Earlier this summer, Jamie McLeod-Skinner announced her plan to become Oregon’s next U.S. Representative, a seat held for 18 years by conservative Greg Walden. An Ashland high graduate, McLeod-Skinner returned back to her home turf after far-flung work experiences in Bosnia and Kosovo in the late 90s, and then

The 2017 Third Oregon Climate Assessment Report concludes: “Oregon is warming and the consequences are, and will be, notable.” No shit.   This summer, nearly two dozen forest fires are still burning in Oregon, and some 400,000 acres in the state, from the Columbia Gorge to the California border, have

Last week, Southern Oregon University announced that the new athletic pavilion will be named after the DeBoer family—as in, the family that founded and owns Lithia Motors. In 1946, in the years before car culture really expanded throughout the United States, Walt DeBoer founded the company. They only sold 14