Author Archive

Phil Busse

Phil Busse

Phil Busse has spent the past 20 years as a journalist, attorney and educator—and doing his tour of duty with alt-weeklies.

He has served as the Editor for the Source, a popular weekly newspaper in Bend, Oregon and was the founding Managing Editor for the Portland Mercury. While in law school, he wrote crime and legal stories for the Eugene Weekly and started his writing career as the first environmental beat reporter for San Francisco Weekly.

In 2006, Phil started the Media Institute for Social Change (MediaMakingChange.org), an educational non-profit. Based in Portland, Oregon, the organization hosts college students each summer to teach them how to produce public interest film and radio documentaries—and, in 2013, helped launch XRAY.FM, a talk and music radio station that won Willamette Week’s readers choice for Best Local Radio Station in 2015.

Phil is truly surprised that he ended up as a newspaperman; as a kid, he believed that he would grow up to be a spy, and has spent a lifetime acquiring the proper skills—he is certified SCUBA diver, knows how to tie a bow tie and can mix (shake) a mean martini.

Phil graduated from Middlebury College in 1992 and earned his law degree from the University of Oregon in 1997.

Rogue Valley Messenger: Last December, you founded and now serve as the Chair of Keeping Ashland Women Safe Task Force, K.A.W.S. How did this organization come about? Alaya Ketani: As an Ashland resident for years, career social worker and hypnotherapist, I am aware of a lot that goes on that

Rogue Valley Messenger: You started Creekside Strings and FiddleQuest. Are they different organizations? Duane Whitcomb: Creekside Strings is a violin school I started about 15 years ago. We are four teachers: Jessie Monter, Rachel Buklad, Monica Smith and myself. We teach over 100 children and adults and put on dances,

Laney D’Aquino is part of a team of videographers and filmmakers who produce trailers for the plays at Oregon Shakespeare Festival. It is its own art form, creating short films about long plays. D’Aquino reflected on the challenges and rewards from the job. Rogue Valley Messenger: Creating a good trailer

It is a simple economic reality: Wine-drinkers in Ashland and Grants Pass can only consume so many glasses of Quady North Syrah or Troon’s Riesling. Although the wine industry in southern Oregon has been growing in numbers of vineyards and production—and steadily increasing the number of visitors to the region—to

In the current Oregon Shakespeare Festival production of Manahatta, a young of Lenape descent, Jane Snake (played by Tanis Parenteau) leaves her family in rural Oklahoma for high-octane financial job on Wall Street, a move that sets in motion parallel stories; one during the early 1600s, when Manhattan was purchased

Local filmmaker Aaron Moffatt both has a foot in the “old”—as is, the thousands-years old nature—and the new—as in, virtual reality. He is currently filming and producing a series of virtual reality films about butterflies to be used for school curriculum. Although often remote in the wilderness, he caught up

The 1996 Telecommunication Act may sound like a somewhat dated and bureaucratic piece of legislation; but, it is really more like a seed planted two decades ago that has grown deep and gnarled roots into American culture. Consider, at the time, the 10,000 or so radio stations in America were

“The 2nd District is large, the size of Florida in fact,” explains Michael Byrne, a stone mason from the Hood River area who is hoping to become the new congressional representative for that district. In fact, the Second District of Oregon covers nearly two-thirds of the state, stretching north to

Havana Libre is as much about macro-international politics as it is about the micro-family relationships and friendships, which is to say Robert Arellano’s latest novel, a follow-up to Havana Lunar, sets giant world events (like the decades of Cuba’s strained politics) against the small day-to-day flirtations, friendships and family matters—or,

Rogue Valley Messenger: Just to be clear: You’re not operating the library, “just” raising money to help keep it operating? Amy Drake: Your property taxes cover the operating budget of the library, which is managed by the Jackson County Library District Board and the Jackson County Library staff. The Foundation