Home»Feature»An Artistic Superheroine: A Profile of Medford Comic Con’s Logo Contest Winner, Junie Maupin

An Artistic Superheroine: A Profile of Medford Comic Con’s Logo Contest Winner, Junie Maupin

2
Shares
Pinterest Google+
Junie Maupin. Photo courtesy of Noah Lee Margetts

Smashing through walls and seeking justice, local artist Junie Maupin has created the new face of the Medford Comic Con, hitting the Medford Library April 27 and 28.

“There were some great and interesting submissions for the Logo Contest, but ultimately, it was a unanimous decision by our committee; there were no runner ups,” says Terra McLeod, Medford Library Branch Manager and co-organizer of the event. “This was the first logo contest, with the intention of keeping it as the first permanent logo for MCC.”

Maupin illustrates the powerful dynamic of how to marry business sense with creative fulfillment. After studying Web Design for Marketing at Klamath Community College, she got a Bachelor’s degree in Emerging Media & Digital Art from SOU, minoring in Business Administration.

Her inspiration towards art as a career started at home. “I’ve always had the support of my family with my art, so obviously that’s a big inspiration there, my older brother drew a lot, then my dad was an artist and my grandma paints,” says Maupin.

When combined with her family’s support and her strategic educational choices, Maupin set herself up well as both an artisan and a businesswoman and has proven so with her victory here at the Medford Comic Con, and she also recently won the logo contest for the City of Ashland’s Fourth of July Festival.

“I was always drawn to female characters,” says Maupin. “Well, usually I draw a lot of women to begin with. I like drawing superhero figures or that kind of thing. I looked at other Comic Con convention logos. That definitely helped design the character that we see today. I did a couple thumbnails, sketched out a few ideas that I was thinking of. Then I scanned my drawings into the computer. I did all the line work and base coloring in Adobe Illustrator. I learned how to do that at Klamath Community College and I also learned the more advanced techniques at SOU when I did my degree in Emerging Media and Digital Art.”

Maupin wins a Central Art Supply $100 gift card, integrated publicity with Comic Con and a free table to the next five MCC’s.

So what now?

“A graphic memoir specific to kind of growing up,” she says. “I think it’d be kind of cool to do. I’ve seen other artists do this too that I’ve drawn inspiration from. They’ve done that kind of graphic memoir thing and I think I want to pursue that. Linda Berry, she makes these really interesting comics about her life. They’re in book forms, not small issues or anything like that. Craig Thomson, he’s another one that did a graphic memoir about growing up.”

Like so many artists, Junie supports herself with non-artistic work and currently works as a Deli Supervisor at the local Grocery Outlet.

“I’m still going to be here in the Rogue Valley,” she says. “I like it here. I moved here from Klamath Falls. I would love to actually work at a place that does graphic design full time. I’d still want to do my little art business thing on the side. I do speed sketches on my YouTube channel. I try to make videos fairly frequently,” says Maupin.

When it comes to social media, she gives this sage advice, “You know, just get yourself out there. It’s not going to happen instantly, the likes or the followers or interactions. Just do it anyway you know because it’s free, it doesn’t cost anything to post something. Just do it and don’t get caught up in like how many followers or likes you have. Because I used to do that and it was a big problem for me when I was starting to draw digitally and everything. It really got to me and then I realized I had to step back from that and kind of reexamine things,” she says.

 

Medford Comic Con
Saturday, April 27 and Sunday, April 28
Medford Library, 205 S. Central Avenue, Medford.

 

2 Comments

  1. Stephanie Hakanson
    April 27, 2019 at 1:08 pm — Reply

    Very nice article. Junie is my grand daughter. She began her cartooning at the young age of 2 1/2, drawing “strips” with great detail. They were so imaginative with complicated narratives as well. I’m very happy for her in her art.

  2. Kristina Hakanson
    May 4, 2019 at 12:19 pm — Reply

    Thank you, Noah Lee Margetts and Rogue Valley Messenger, for this affirming piece–not just because Junie is my daughter, but because your article also recognized the effort this wonderful young person has made, both in her art and in business, to bring something special to the Rogue Valley.

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.